American Voters Prefer Merit-Based Immigration System

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If nepotism isn’t tolerated in the workplace, why is it the cornerstone of the United States’ immigration system?

Nepotism is widely considered an unfair and unethical practice in the United States. Most businesses make a special point to ensure employees that they do not practice nepotism when hiring new workers. For congressional members and many other federal agencies, it is illegal. 5 U.S.C. Section 3110, prohibits congressional members “from appointing, promoting, or recommending for appointment or promotion any ‘relative’.”

Merit-based employment a basic cornerstone of capitalism. Not only is it accepted as the standard practice, it’s celebrated as a means of ensuring equal opportunity in the workplace.

This ethical concept should equally be applied to immigration. However, the current rules favor nepotism over merit. According to The Federation for American Immigration Reform, only 7 percent of green cards currently issued are based on skill, while 93 percent are based on other criteria such as family chain migration. Because of this, the federal government rejects many well-qualified candidates in favor of the extended families of current immigrants – without regard to their qualifications.

Americans want potential immigrants to earn their spot in society, just as they have. In a survey conducted by Rasmussen on April 3-4 and released last week, a plurality of voters (47 percent) favored “moving to a merit-based system for legal immigration.” Only 32 percent preferred to “keep the existing family-based system.”

In his first address to Congress in February, President Trump called for immigration reform that included ending the current extended relative-based system in favor of a skills-based approach. “Switching away from [the United States’]current system of lower-skilled immigration, and instead adopting a merit-based system will have many benefits: It will save countless dollars, raise workers’ wages, and help struggling families — including immigrant families — enter the middle class.”

The economic and national security needs of the United States would be best served by a merit-based immigration system that requires a specific set of criteria be met before candidates are considered for admission. Not only would this serve the best interests of the American people, it would restore core principles to the immigration process.

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About Author

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Spencer joined the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) in 2015. He conducts research, and writes content for FAIR’s publications and website. He brings previous experience in state politics, gubernatorial and district campaigns, and D.C. political non-profits. Spencer holds a B.A. in Government from the University of Texas at Austin.

7 Comments

  1. avatar

    SELECTING THE BEST IMMIGRANTS.

    The United States of America has a right
    to be selective about which foreign nationals
    to accept as authorized immigrants
    —with the expectation that they
    will eventually become American citizens.

    Immigration reform should include
    ending chain-immigration of family members
    who have no other reason for being admitted to America
    than that they have family members already living in the USA.

    Here are some specific qualities
    to look for in selecting new authorized immigrants:

    http://www.tc.umn.edu/~parkx032/CY-IDEAL.html

  2. avatar

    Merit Based, Financial Based and Skills Based, Etc.

    We’ve got plenty of experienced “LEGAL CITIZEN” Americans “give-ups not in labor force” with experience, professional degreed skills and merits….about 100M of them. Hire them first, then worry about immigration.

    The immigration pause should take a few decades to get these “first in line” citizens jobs first.

    Let’s be honest about this topic for once.

  3. avatar

    In the May Harper’s magazine Andrew Cockburn repeats the oldest cliche in the book, namely that if Republicans just adopt a pro amnesty position then more Hispanics will vote their way. He claims: “Texas Republicans might recall what happened to their once-powerful brethren in California when they turned on immigrants in the 1990s. They swiftly found themselves living in a one party blue state.”

    First of all, they never “turned on immigrants”, they simply expected them to obey the law. California has become a blue state in large part because of the children of illegals who were born here and are turning voting age. Nearly half a million anchor babies reach 18 every year in this country and that is exactly what the Democrats wanted, because most vote that way.

    Second, all the evidence is that Latinos will support Democrats even if the GOP matches them step for step on amnesty. Every poll shows they favor the big government programs endorsed by the Democrats. It’s not even arguable. The only group who voted Republican was the Cubans and that was because they blamed JFK for the Bay of Pigs fiasco.

    Reagan signed the “one time” 1986 amnesty, and 2 years later his vice president, George H. W. Bush, who supported it, got only 30% of the Hispanic vote against Dukakis. McCain, who has always been in lockstep with Chuck Schumer on “reform”, got 31% in 2008. People who say they will vote GOP are denying reality.

    • avatar

      Leland if your logic is correct…years later….more hispanic voters…how come Trump won..you are as dumb as they come///